Extreme Heat in Central New York Leads to Extreme Caution

Live report from the field on Thursday, Aug. 4th.

SYRACUSE, N.Y.  (NCCNews) — A heat advisory is in effect for the city of  Syracuse as temperatures are expected to hit triple digits with humidity, something Central New Yorkers have unfortunately been getting used to.

It’s not easy to stay cool, especially with the humidity cutting through the clouds like a knife.

Trying to beat the heat can be a challenge, but some are starting to figure it out.

Pat Tato is a local musician and was out walking his dog today during the cooler part of the day. Tato said it was a quick decision to try to get around the heat today.

“I was going to test it out, and I saw that  at 10 o’clock it was going to be the hottest and it’s going to stay this way all day. We’ve been in front of the fan quite honestly,” Tato said.

The New York State Department of Health recommends drinking plenty of water and avoiding unnecessary activities outside.

Also, if possible, stay in an air-conditioned building or visit the nearest cooling center, which may include a public library or even some community centers. You can find a full list of cooling centers in our area here:  https://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/weather/cooling/ 

Other tips from the New York State Department of Health:

-Wear sunscreen
-Slow your pace
-Drink water and rest more often
-Seek shade and avoid long periods in direct sunlight
-Do not hike in extremely hot weather

It is also important to pay attention for signs of heat stroke.  Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States. These heat-related deaths and illness are preventable.

Symptoms of heat stroke include:

Hot, dry, red skin
A rapid pulse
Rapid and shallow breathing
A body temperature higher than 105 degrees
Loss of alertness, confusion, and/or loss of consciousness

Central New York Farmers are Looking to use Their Voices

FABIUS,  N.Y. (NCC News) – Local Farmer Bret Bossard gets into his tractor every day to check around his farm in Fabius, making sure his product is up to standard. In this case, the farm produces dairy goods. Bossard and his team face different challenges day in and day out and he wants more people to know that it is not easy to be a farmer.

“It’s hard, it’s a struggle every day,” Bossard said. “We face the same challenges as every other industry…labor shortages, inflation, rising costs.”

Governor Hochul, who grew up in a farming family, knows that change is needed. The legislation that is simply known as the Farm Bill is set to expire next year and the governor wants to hear directly from the people the bill affects most.

“People from elsewhere think of New York, they don’t always think agriculture. But, that’s what we live and breathe in our state,” Gov. Hochul said.

The state will be hosting a series of roundtables inviting the farming community to give their thoughts on where the future of farming is heading.

For an industry that accounts for nearly $7 million acres of land in New York or a quarter of the state, Bossard said he wants local farmers to have a seat at the table.

“As long as those that are making the laws are, you know,  can hear the voices and hopefully we can have an equal say,” Bossard said.

The dairy farmer has 75 people employees. They all depend on the farm to put the product they help produce on their own tables. Bossard said the upcoming changes are important to get right.